Bolshviks on the Brazos

3,609 Views | 114 Replies | Last: 4 days ago by KOK QB 70
Carlos Safety
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We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
bear2be2
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Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.
cms186
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Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.
very well put
I'm the English Guy
Thee University
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bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.
Lets not ignore that you have to try to make it work and you have to work at it. Don't ignore this fact.

Trillions of $$$$ have been spent trying to help. Don't ignore this fact.

Where is the leadership in the black community? Why are 74% of households without as father? Is this whitey's fault too?

You have to have willing participants with leadership.
ATL Bear
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PartyBear said:

Why does this statement offend you so much? And a follow up why don't actual racist statements frequently thrown around here not? Why doesn't calling making the campus more friendly to minority students Bolshevik offend you?
Good questions. One of the pillars of racism and racialism is to undermine the concept of individualism in favor of group identity. It's how blacks were targeted, and every major group since and before. You curb freedom by assigning condition across a group regardless of individual circumstance. So to expect there is some monolithic "sea of whiteness" that needs to be "fixed" is the exact same approach every oppressor has used. That is why it is a mechanism of racism disguised to address racism. This is like a Maoist struggle session of shaming, not a conversation or process of change when you assume and project beliefs across a diverse spectrum of individuals.

As to the Bolshevik comment, clearly used as an extreme for effect, but I didn't see it as a slap at the idea of making the campus better for minorities (acknowledged that black lives matter), but a push back on some of the extreme statements that were made in the conversation. Despite the trend these days, it isn't automatically racist to disagree with many of the ideas being thrown around. Otherwise it isn't a conversation, it's a lecture.
RD2WINAGNBEAR86
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bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.
You are my #2 most woke poster on these boards right behind Waco1947. Don't think you will catch him until he checks out. (cinque and username checks out are not in the running because they are paid to post).
MANSA - "Make America Not Scared Again!"
Carlos Safety
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bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.


Since I have been in almost every income and social strata in this country except outright impoverished and starving, I will let you in on a secret. I became wealthy and debt free when I decided no one would provide for me or cause me to be successful except myself and God.

When I was on the verge of defaulting on my student loans and missing my first rent payment (which would mean eviction), I cut up my credit cards and told God that:

1. I would not apply for unemployment despite being eligible

2. I would not allow the government to provide for me. God would be my God and provider, not Washington DC

3. I would forgive those against whom I harbored forgiveness and

4. I would honor my parents.

I went from broke and in slavery to banks to debt free in a few years. It was seven years and God bought me out of bondage. You can go on having a poverty of spirit and a spirit of poverty. Or you can repent and seek God, His ways, and His blessings.

This is not the prosperity Gospel, which I hate. This is a spiritual principle. As long as you hate your brother by seeing things through an ethnic lens, even your blessings will feel like curses. You need to repent.
curtpenn
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Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Much truth to what you say and I certainly agree that speaking of white "privilege" immediately sets me off, and I'm sure a great many others. Words have meaning and those married to the term use it for a reason. It's totally weaponized and denying that is completely in the category of the "big lie". Truth of the matter is, I've tried to treat everyone I meet with respect until they demonstrate they don't deserve it. But now, I'm developing a serious level of resentment towards the whole BLM/antifa/rioting/looting/defacing/desecrating/cancelling/replacing bunch of idiots. You are what your actions say you are.
whitetrash
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RD2WINAGNBEAR86 said:

bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.
You are my #2 most woke poster on these boards right behind Waco1947. Don't think you will catch him until he checks out. (cinque and username checks out are not in the running because they are paid to post).
You just hurt George Truett's feelings. He tries so hard to be woke but ends up faceplanting most of the time.
Herron2
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Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
GolemIII
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Florda_mike
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And you're 110% racist! Maybe even more!
Florda_mike
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bear2be2 said:

PartyBear said:

Why does this statement offend you so much? And a follow up why don't actual racist statements frequently thrown around here not? Why doesn't calling making the campus more friendly to minority students Bolshevik offend you?

These are good questions. I'm frequently amazed by the blatant racism/bigotry that goes unanswered on this forum. And that's not even including the veiled stuff. When you let that go, and routinely get offended by others' responses to racism, the conclusions one can draw about your positions on American race relations are fairly limited.


You posses thin skin and need a coat of armor protecting you from your unfounded fear

Oh, you're also a hyper racist like your brother Cinque
Florda_mike
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bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

My sort-of-white experience includes being indebted almost $130,000 in student loans and virtually homeless for a couple of years. Is this the privilege we are looking for?
White privilege doesn't mean you've lived an easy life. It means your skin color hasn't contributed to the adversity you've faced.


Does your skin color allow you to have to overcome adversity?
George Truett
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Herron2 said:

Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
This is well said, but I don't agree. The term "white privilege" is offensive because white people don't want to believe they have it. True, they work hard, but they still enjoy a privileged place vis a vie people of color.

I come from "mill people." They worked in Southern cotton mills. Their lives were difficult and they worked hard. But they had much more than blacks who lived in their communities. They had better access to medical care, their kids went to better schools, etc., etc.

I know it's upsetting to many white people, but in this moment, I think something provocative is needed to get people to open their eyes and see something they've not seen. I don't think "Black disadvantage" communicates the situation as well.

I think Dr. Livingstone put it really well. We whites swim in our privilege without being aware of it. We're becoming more aware and that's a good thing. But we have a long way to go.

Doc Holliday
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George Truett said:

Herron2 said:

Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
This is well said, but I don't agree. The term "white privilege" is offensive because white people don't want to believe they have it. True, they work hard, but they still enjoy a privileged place vis a vie people of color.

I come from "mill people." They worked in Southern cotton mills. Their lives were difficult and they worked hard. But they had much more than blacks who lived in their communities. They had better access to medical care, their kids went to better schools, etc., etc.

I know it's upsetting to many white people, but in this moment, I think something provocative is needed to get people to open their eyes and see something they've not seen. I don't think "Black disadvantage" communicates the situation as well.

I think Dr. Livingstone put it really well. We whites swim in our privilege without being aware of it. We're becoming more aware and that's a good thing. But we have a long way to go.


As Marxist history shows us, the next discussion after accepting your premise is that we should make white lives more difficult so that we can de-privilage white people.

Proposals:

Scholarships and Student loans no longer available to white people.
Race based taxes.
Reparations.
etc.


Another decade of radicalism and this is where we're at.
Herron2
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George Truett said:

Herron2 said:

Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
This is well said, but I don't agree. The term "white privilege" is offensive because white people don't want to believe they have it. True, they work hard, but they still enjoy a privileged place vis a vie people of color.

I come from "mill people." They worked in Southern cotton mills. Their lives were difficult and they worked hard. But they had much more than blacks who lived in their communities. They had better access to medical care, their kids went to better schools, etc., etc.

I know it's upsetting to many white people, but in this moment, I think something provocative is needed to get people to open their eyes and see something they've not seen. I don't think "Black disadvantage" communicates the situation as well.
I think Dr. Livingstone put it really well. We whites swim in our privilege without being aware of it. We're becoming more aware and that's a good thing. But we have a long way to go.




I appreciate the tone and reason of your response though I disagree. The phrase is insulting to any hard working white person and few, if any, will be shocked or shamed by this phrase into some better state of mind.

While my experience is anecdotal, the resentment I'm hearing towards those who are using the phrase in a punitive or derogative manner, regardless of the speaker's skin color, is. creating unnecessary and unhelpful division.

I guess we'll have agree to disagree but, from what I can tell, the relatively few white people who have been positively affected by the phtase are some college students and some professors. A small group that do not represent the majority of white people who are naturally insulted by being labeled "privileged".

If it's true that one reaps what one sows, then this predominantly bad seed is inevitably going to bring forth predominantly bad fruit. This looks much mote like the language of "stealing, killing and destroying" than the language of humility, forgiveness, grace and peace, which I believe could be much more productive.

Simply put, a divided house will ultimately fall, and the phrase "white privilege", regardless of the user's intent, is offensive to most white people and thus divisive. The potential collapse is just accelerated.

Osodecentx
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Herron2 said:

Simply put, a divided house will ultimately fall, and the phrase "white privilege", regardless of the user's intent, is offensive to most white people and thus divisive. The potential collapse is just accelerated.
I agree. If America's original sin is slavery, then we are reaping the fruit ... again.

Herron2
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Osodecentx said:

Herron2 said:

Simply put, a divided house will ultimately fall, and the phrase "white privilege", regardless of the user's intent, is offensive to most white people and thus divisive. The potential collapse is just accelerated.
I agree. If America's original sin is slavery, then we are reaping the fruit ... again.


No doubt. Combine that with ongoing human sacrifice in the name of "choice" (i.e. utter selfishness), and the present level of violence and meanness should surprise no one. I suspect the fruit will get even worse, but God still cares and can still intervene if he chooses to do so. At the very least, we can ask God to change hearts and minds (including our own) to love and protect our fellow humans regardless of physical, emotional or mental development and attributes.
Osodecentx
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Herron2 said:

Osodecentx said:

Herron2 said:

Simply put, a divided house will ultimately fall, and the phrase "white privilege", regardless of the user's intent, is offensive to most white people and thus divisive. The potential collapse is just accelerated.
I agree. If America's original sin is slavery, then we are reaping the fruit ... again.


No doubt. Combine that with ongoing human sacrifice in the name of "choice" (i.e. utter selfishness), and the present level of violence and meanness should surprise no one. I suspect the fruit will get even worse, but God still cares and can still intervene if he chooses to do so. At the very least, we can ask God to change hearts and minds (including our own) to love and protect our fellow humans regardless of physical, emotional or mental development and attributes.
I believe God is withdrawing His restraining and protective hand. He is allowing the consequences of our sin to take their course. We are seeing and experiencing the destruction of relationships, marriages, cities and our nation. I believe it is inevitable.

He is turning us over to our 'things' for our happiness and pursuit of things can't makes us happy


curtpenn
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George Truett said:

Herron2 said:

Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
This is well said, but I don't agree. The term "white privilege" is offensive because white people don't want to believe they have it. True, they work hard, but they still enjoy a privileged place vis a vie people of color.

I come from "mill people." They worked in Southern cotton mills. Their lives were difficult and they worked hard. But they had much more than blacks who lived in their communities. They had better access to medical care, their kids went to better schools, etc., etc.

I know it's upsetting to many white people, but in this moment, I think something provocative is needed to get people to open their eyes and see something they've not seen. I don't think "Black disadvantage" communicates the situation as well.

I think Dr. Livingstone put it really well. We whites swim in our privilege without being aware of it. We're becoming more aware and that's a good thing. But we have a long way to go.


Your problem is you "think something provocative is needed". You should be careful what you wish for. I foresee an entirely justifiable backlash.
Redbrickbear
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bear2be2 said:

Carlos Safety said:

We are either going to be equal before the law or we are not? Which do want: equal or not? The not involves nonsense like privilege and intersectionality. Equality excludes these silly notions.
We clearly haven't achieved equality despite our best legislative efforts. To ignore that fact is to ignore reality.

And frankly, to think that a handful of law changes and a few decades of time would undo centuries of systemic oppression is pretty naive.
If trillions of dollars, endless programs, job employment and education discrimination against white males, and endless media support can't bring about "leveling" the field between blacks and whites...then we need to admit this experiment has failed.

It's failed in South Africa and it has failed everywhere it has been tried.

Maybe we need to admit that race exclusive nations exist for a very good reason.
Bearitto
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George Truett said:

Herron2 said:

Pablo Fanque said:

Watch the whole video before anyone goes completely ballistic. Of course there is truth in the OP - the quotes are accurate for the most part. But much of the OP is overwrought hysteria based on cherry-picked quotes and mischaracterization.

Here's what I, a white male who votes Republican, take from statements like Greg Garrett's: I walk through the world each day not really thinking about the fact that I am white. When I walk into H-E-B, I'm thinking about my grocery needs, and not really thinking about being white. Same with driving on Hwy 84 through Woodway - I'm thinking about a lot of things, but "I'm white" isn't one of them (though I usually AM thinking about keeping my speed down to about 5-10 MPH over the speed limit).

Yet there are numerous black people who say that, when out in public, they are conscious of their skin color. A black person at H-E-B is thinking about his grocery needs AND about the fact that he is black. Having seen who gets pulled over in Woodway, I can't imagine a black person driving through there who isn't thinking "I'm black - better obey every rule."

And this rings true to me. When I meet a white person, I don't immediately note "Oh, he's a white guy." I look at other things, but "white" isn't one of them. Now, I look at the same sorts of things as well when meeting a black person, but I assure you that one of the first things that pops into my brain is "Oh, this is a black guy."

The term "white privilege" is intentionally provocative, making it ineffective in getting the most intransigent whites to admit to the concept the phrase seeks to describe. Perhaps it would be easier to get conservative white guys to admit that "black disadvantage" exists. Either way, the point is much the same as Greg Garrett's, even if it is phrased in less-woke lingo - there is a net disadvantage in today's America to being black. If you don't think so, then ask yourself if you'd like to be black instead of white. Most likely, either your answer is no, or you're lying to yourself.

Admitting that these kinds of things are real is NOT the same as embracing a left-wing political agenda. But conservatives will get nowhere in stopping the absurd woke progressivism if they can't even acknowledge that being black is a disadvantage in our society.


Wow! So much that is so well expressed! Well done sir!

Without discussing all of your points, I do want to reiterate your mention of the offensive and divisive phrase "white privilege." Most of my friends, family and acquaintances are white and have worked and continue to work very hard to have attained what little they have. They/we did not come from wealthy families and when others call them/us "privileged", they/we can often, naturally, feel insulted.

While most, if not all, of us would agree that it is much easier to be white than black in this country and would like to see equal opportunity for equal merit regardless of skin color, few of us, like so many black people or other minorities, feel like we are a part of some privileged class that never had to work hard or face any adversity.

So when the phrase "white privilege" is, at best, carelessly or foolishly (on its face it's offensive to many hard working, white Americans) thrown around, the natural result is anger and defensiveness. While this may not be the intended result, it is the understandable and predictable result for those who feel like their efforts are being ridiculed simply because of their skin color. The phrase is foolishness, if not incendiary, and should be dropped.

I suspect no good will come from the repeated beating/shaming of white people with this phrase. What little good may result, I fear will be far outweighed by the unnecessary resentment and defensiveness being instilled in many of the hard working, average, angry and well armed white masses. While I'm not describing myself necessarily (I'm fortunate enough to somewhat understand that I've been forgiven immeasurably, and, thus, should go and do likewise) I'm not so sure my acquaintances are so enlightened or fortunate.

To summarize, the phrase "white privilege" is inherently offensive to many, if not most, white people, and the net result as measured by racial unity will likely be negative. While I do not suggest that the phrase should be banned or censored, I would simply suggest that more consideration be given to phraseology. In other words, if your goal is racial equality, then being a little more descriptive of historical and current racial inequities (not the patently offensive "you're white, thus, you're privileged" (and, thus, patently absurd, if you are attempting to accomplish any meaningful change)). Quite simply, point out the disparities without engaging in broad brush insulting of the hard work of the "majority".

P.S. - It's my understanding that people who currently live at the U.S. poverty level are still within the top 10% wealth level in this world. If we self-implode over destructive phrases like white privilege, should we expect any mercy when those who view us (all of us) as "America Privileged" (or whatever) move in to harvest whatever remains?
This is well said, but I don't agree. The term "white privilege" is offensive because white people don't want to believe they have it. True, they work hard, but they still enjoy a privileged place vis a vie people of color.

I come from "mill people." They worked in Southern cotton mills. Their lives were difficult and they worked hard. But they had much more than blacks who lived in their communities. They had better access to medical care, their kids went to better schools, etc., etc.

I know it's upsetting to many white people, but in this moment, I think something provocative is needed to get people to open their eyes and see something they've not seen. I don't think "Black disadvantage" communicates the situation as well.

I think Dr. Livingstone put it really well. We whites swim in our privilege without being aware of it. We're becoming more aware and that's a good thing. But we have a long way to go.




nein51
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Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?
nein51
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When you look for racism in everything you will see it everywhere. If you look for ways to be unhappy you will always find them.
Thee University
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nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?

Open your wallet. It is coming.
HashTag
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nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?

They'll want you to wear black face to hide your whiteness?
TexasScientist
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SIC EM 94 said:

Do we know if Livingstone's family tree includes any slave owners or Confederates? If so, it's time for her to go!
What do you think about renaming Baylor? R. E. B. Baylor participated in the Alabama Creek Indian Campaign, and the Battle of Plum Creek near Lockhart, under the command of Edward Burleson.
nein51
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TexasScientist said:

SIC EM 94 said:

Do we know if Livingstone's family tree includes any slave owners or Confederates? If so, it's time for her to go!
What do you think about renaming Baylor? R. E. B. Baylor participated in the Alabama Creek Indian Campaign, and the Battle of Plum Creek near Lockhart, under the command of Edward Burleson.

I'm not ok with that. I'm also not ok renaming Yale or any other institution.
bear2be2
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nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
Bearitto
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bear2be2 said:

nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
The notion of white privilege is both fictional and extraordinarily racist. Racial sin, racial victimization and racial accountability are pure evil. Anyone who advocates it is equally evil.
Shippou
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Bearitto said:

bear2be2 said:

nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
The notion of white privilege is both fictional and extraordinarily racist. Racial sin, racial victimization and racial accountability are pure evil. Anyone who advocates it is equally evil.
How's it fictional and racist to acknowledge that your life is different than mine and has never been impacted by your skin color?
ATL Bear
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Shippou said:

Bearitto said:

bear2be2 said:

nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
The notion of white privilege is both fictional and extraordinarily racist. Racial sin, racial victimization and racial accountability are pure evil. Anyone who advocates it is equally evil.
How's it fictional and racist to acknowledge that your life is different than mine and has never been impacted by your skin color?
Because lives of the same skin color are different also?
PartyBear
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ATL Bear said:

Shippou said:

Bearitto said:

bear2be2 said:

nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
The notion of white privilege is both fictional and extraordinarily racist. Racial sin, racial victimization and racial accountability are pure evil. Anyone who advocates it is equally evil.
How's it fictional and racist to acknowledge that your life is different than mine and has never been impacted by your skin color?
Because lives of the same skin color are different also?
If we played semantics and called the concept "Black Disadvantage" are you offended still and unable to acknowledge the existence of the concept?
ATL Bear
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PartyBear said:

ATL Bear said:

Shippou said:

Bearitto said:

bear2be2 said:

nein51 said:

Let's just say that white privilege exists, it's a thing, I acknowledge it and I can get 10 of my friends to acknowledge it and they can get 10 of their friends to acknowledge it...we will all hold hands and loudly and proudly say we are privileged...now what or better stated, so what?

I see so many arguments for "white people just need to acknowledge their privilege"...ok, done, so what do you want next?


I think the idea is that if you can see and acknowledge where your privilege exists, you'll start to more easily see where others' doesn't and stop ignoring/denying the existence of problems that black people have been telling us for years are problems.

One of the biggest takeaways I've had from this period in our history is that black people are looking for white allies to help them convince other white people that they're not making these issues up. And it's not just radical, militant BLM types who are asking for this. It's the people in our communities that we interact with regularly. Our black friends and neighbors are telling us they're dealing with these things and we haven't done a very good job of listening -- largely because our experiences haven't matched theirs.

So to me, that's the next step. Once we've acknowledged that inequality still exists in the treatment of whites and blacks in our society, we can try to help others see this and understand that a more just society that truly treats everyone as equals is better for everybody.
The notion of white privilege is both fictional and extraordinarily racist. Racial sin, racial victimization and racial accountability are pure evil. Anyone who advocates it is equally evil.
How's it fictional and racist to acknowledge that your life is different than mine and has never been impacted by your skin color?
Because lives of the same skin color are different also?
If we played semantics and called the concept "Black Disadvantage" are you offended still and unable to acknowledge the existence of the concept?
I'm not offended because it's all semantics. Black Lives Matter, All Lives Matter, Blue Lives Matter, White Privilege, Black Disadvantage, sea of whiteness, etc. Call me a pragmatist that would rather deal in quantifiable issues, not sloganism. Especially sloganism that attempts to group diverse segments of the population under an umbrella only defined by skin pigment. Let's deal in issues not emotion, especially those meant to evoke racist or racialist angst.

I've taken my lumps on this board because I do believe in the issue of police brutality, changing how we police, and stopping the militarization of law enforcement. I'm with that cause. But George Floyd wasn't choked out because George Washington had slaves. We needn't alter history to create a better future for all. And while the place I come from for this opinion might be skewed, not by my whiteness but having been among some of the poorest and most hopeless areas in the world, especially for blacks, I don't see the "disadvantage" as much as I see missed opportunities. I believe all citizens of this country regardless of race or ethnicity are privileged to some level to be in this country and the freedom and opportunities it presents. No, not everyone's journey is going to be the same. Some will be much more difficult than others. But let's take a look at what the quantifiable inhibitors are and work to fix them.
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